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Asia - Mobile Communication Statistics (tables only)

Mobile markets in Asia have continued experiencing rapid growth during 2009, despite many countries close to or over the 90% penetration mark. This has resulted in the Asia region being home to the fastest growing telecommunications markets in the world. Excluding the highly penetrated markets, growth has been in excess of 20% across the remaining markets, with average annual growth being well over the 30% mark. This is particularly relevant in India and China where monthly net additions are regularly in excess of the 10 million subscriber mark. These two countries alone account for over 22% and 35% overall market share in the Asia-Pacific region respectively; or a massive 57% combined

There is still room for substantial growth. Markets with large populations and relatively low penetration rates, such as India, China, Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam and Indonesia, will continue to grow at a rapid rate. In the more mature markets such as Japan, Taiwan and South Korea, mobile numbers will rise less than 5%. Growth is being driven by various factors, including government investment to drive the economy; infrastructure building after years of neglect or fixing the aftereffects in war torn countries, and also major foreign investment.

In the developing economies quick and easy mobile uptake is the preferred, and often only, option for subscribers, exacerbated by low fixed-line deployments. These countries also offer investors the promise of continued growth of the mobile infrastructure and subscriber numbers. While subscriber growth and market share is important in the developing economies, there comes a point where the venture must result in profits.

Operators still face the huge challenge of trying to prevent ARPU slide as mobile services spread to poorer parts of the population. To an extent, a large customer base will help to offset low spend but it is also hoped that new non-voice services will help to drive revenue. Operators are developing mobile services such as mobile banking, remittence payments, and mobile health services that take advantage of a lack of access by the poor to social infrastructure such as banks and hospitals.

You can read more about this market in Paul Budde's Asia mobile telecoms report...

This report provides 303 tables of mobile communications and some mobile data (as far as available) statistics covering 35 countries in Asia. Data shown for North Korea is scant due to its paucity and unreliability.

Researcher: Peter Evans
Publication date: December 2009 (15th Edition)
Number of pages: 125
Single User PDF license - GBP 1,100 (Order online)
10 user PDF license - GBP 2,200 (Order online)

Delivery by e-mail, up to 24 working hours



Asian - Fixed Voice Market

While growth in the fixed-line market has flattened out and in some markets the numbers are declining, activity in this market continues to be overshadowed by frenzied activity in the booming mobile market. Nevertheless fixed infrastructure remains an important component in the overall development of the telecom sector.

As Asia entered 2009 it had close to 2.3 billion telephone services; of these services 575 million were fixed and almost 1.7 billion were mobile services. By end-2009 it was expected that total telephone services would be around 2.7 billion; but the total fixed numbers will contract again and be around 560 million by year end.

The standout market in terms of fixed-line subscribers has been China. Despite declining from 365 million subscribers by end 2007 to an estimated 325 million by end 2009, the country still represents almost 60% of the total regional subscriber base. As shown in the Table below, China is well ahead of the rest of the market in this respect. It is interesting to note that a number of the highly sophisticated telecom markets in Asia are also highly penetrated fixed-line markets; leaders in this regard are Taiwan (62% teledensity), Hong Kong (59%) and South Korea (44%). These are followed by Singapore (40%) and Japan (38%). As Singapore had only around 1.8 million fixed-line subscribers in 2009 it did not qualify to be included in the Table below. Nevertheless it remained a significant fixed-line market with its 40% penetration.

Of the 35 or so countries in Asia, the top 10 that are listed in the Table below claimed about 90% of the region’s fixed-line services by 2009.

As with other segments of the telecom market in Asia, we note the ever-present gap between the developed and developing economies of the region. In the developing economies, the building of essential fixed-line infrastructure has been largely ignored in favour of rolling out mobile networks as a quick way of providing telephone services to the population. In developing countries where governments have tried to force the pace of fixed-line roll-outs, the success rate has been mixed. In the Philippines and Indonesia these programs have been conspicuously ineffective; however, in a market like Vietnam, significant progress has been made, lifting that country up to become one of the more highly-penetrated fixed-line markets in the region at 34% teledensity. We have also seen a successful push in Indonesia to expand the fixed network; subscriber growth of 70% occurred in 2008 and was continuing in 2009 on the back of widespread deployment of WLL technology.

The other characteristic of the fixed line markets in Asia as we have already noted is that growth has flattened out and in some markets gone into serious decline. The estimated subscriber base for Asia’s top 10 markets at the end of 2009; many of the listed markets are clearly revealing a downward trend as seen in the Table. The two exceptions in this group of countries are Indonesia and Vietnam.

You can read more about this market in Paul Budde's Asia fixed telecoms report...

This report provides 303 tables of mobile communications and some mobile data (as far as available) statistics covering 35 countries in Asia. Data shown for North Korea is scant due to its paucity and unreliability.

Researcher: Lisa Hulme-Jones, Peter Evans
Publication date: January 2010 (15th Edition)
Number of pages: 295
Single User PDF license - GBP 785 (Order online)
10 user PDF license - GBP 1,575 (Order online)

Delivery by e-mail, up to 24 working hours
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